SABLE-3

Southern Alberta Balloon Launch Experiments
August 11th, 2007

Third time lucky and Tony now has the photo he wanted -  a view from 117,597 feet.

SABLE-3 was launched on Saturday, August 11th, 2007, at 9:31 AM with a payload, consisting of a Nikon Coolpix P2 digital camera set to take 1 image every minute and a Byonics MicroTrak 300 APRS Tracker, that the Kaysam 1200 gram balloon carried to over 117,597 feet. The last payload camera photo from the ground was just before it was launched, at 9:31 AM, and the last photo before the balloon burst was the photo above, at 12:01 PM, exactly 2 hours or 150 images later. And what a photo. The composition couldn't have been better or the horizon more level and out of the 196 images taken during the flight,  only 1 other image is as good. What are the chances?


Tony as he is about to release SABLE-3 and then .....


Sable-3 is on it's way.


 Above - Tony, Brian VE6JBJ & James fill the balloon with helium
while ......   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(left) yours truly assembles a battery pack for the tracker using Lithium AA cells and then ..........

(right) Tony & I close & seal up the payload package after switching on and ensuring the tracker and camera are operating correctly.


Meanwhile, the balloon has grown larger and has been filled.


Above - (left) Tony checking the camera angle wanted and

(right) the payload container, parachute and balloon are tied together before heading outside to the launch area (below).



SABLE-3's Track from aprs.he.fi
Click on the map for a larger image and additional information.
Click 'HERE' to view the path using Google Earth or Google Maps

 

SABLE-3 Payload Camera Photos

'Click' on photos for larger images and additional information.
Altitudes are in feet ASL (Above Sea Level) unless noted as in feet AGL (Above Ground Level).


Image 0 at 9:31
from 0 ft. AGL

Image 1 at 9:32
≈ 3300 ft. ( 800 ft. AGL )

Image 6 at 9:37
≈ 7200 ft. ( 4700 ft. AGL )

Image 8 at 9:39
≈ 8800 ft. ( 6300 ft. AGL )

Image 9 at 9:40
≈ 9800 ft. ( 7300 ft. AGL )

Image 10 at 9:41
≈ 10,600 ft. ( 8100 ft. AGL )

Image 12 at 9:43
≈ 12,000 ft. ( 9500 ft. AGL )

Image 13 at 9:44
 ≈ 12,800 ft.

Image 15 at 9:46
from ≈ 14,300 ft.

Image 20 at 9:51
from ≈ 17,200 ft.

Image 26 at 9:57
from ≈ 20,800 ft.

Image 29 at 10:00
from ≈ 22,900 ft.

Image 75 at 10:46
from ≈ 54,400 ft.

Image 80 at 10:51
from ≈ 58,100 ft.

Image 103 at 11:14
from ≈ 76,900 ft.

Image 110 at 11.21
from ≈ 83,300 ft.

Image 120 at 11:31
from ≈ 92,700 ft.

Image 135 at 11:46
from ≈ 106,300 ft.

Image 150 at 12:01
from max. alt. of ≈ 117,597 ft.

Image 151 at 12:02
from ≈ 112,500 ft.

Image 156 at 12:07
from ≈ 77,900 ft.

Image 158 at 12:09
from ≈ 69,700 ft.

Image 159 at 12:10
from ≈ 66,000 ft.

Image 166 at 12:17
from ≈ 45,400 ft.

Image 169 at 12:20
from ≈ 39,000 ft.

Image 174 at 12:25
from ≈ 29,700 ft.

Image 177 at 12:28
from ≈ 25,000 ft.

Image 179 at 12:30
from ≈ 22,000 ft.

Image 183 at 12:34
from ≈ 16,800 ft.

Image 186 at 12:37
from ≈ 13,100 ft.

Image 189 at 12:40
≈ 9700 ft. ( 7600 ft. AGL )

Image 194 at 12:45
≈ 4200 ft. ( 2100 ft. AGL )

Image 195 at 12:46
≈ 3200 ft. ( 1100 ft. AGL )

Image 196 at 12:47
from 0 ft. AGL again.
 

Above - Several recovery teams were on the scene in time to see the payload land and Tony gets his first chance to see what remains after one of these balloons bursts.
Below - The rest of the recovery teams arrive within minutes and the payload package was opened to check the camera (which was cold, but otherwise fine) and take a quick look at the images.

 

More information regarding high altitude balloon flights and aviation:

NASA High-Altitude Balloon - nasa.gov

High Altitude Aviation - asc-csa.gc.ca

Low Altitude Flights - wgc.mb.ca

Flights Over Canada - cheapflights.ca

Organized Flights - rcaf-arc.forces.gc.ca

Training Flights - tc.ga.ca

Aviation and Flight Technology - senecac.on.ca


Above (from L - R) - Brian VE6JBJ, myself - Barry VE6SBS, Tony VA6TNY, and James VE6SRV
with the tangled remains of the balloon, parachute, payload package and antenna.

And a Thanks to Bart, VE6VB, for most of the launch and recovery photos and to
James, VE6SRV, for payload camera photo descriptions and other web page assistance.

This would normally have been the end of the story, but not this time.
Checkout The Aftermath from SABLE-3


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